Ecoyarns Top Down Socks Part 2 Heel Turn

This part of the sock recipe is the one that makes beginners nervous. Never fear, give it a try and we have provided a wordy version of the heel turn with pictures to help.

Abbreviations

Sl: Slip 

k: knit 

p: purl 

k2tog: knit 2 together

p2tog: purl 2 together

ssk: slip 2 stitches knitwise, insert left needle into front of the 2 slipped stitches, knit through back loops.

Heel flap

Redistribute stitches for 32 stitches on one needle (Heel stitches) and 16 stitches each on 2 other needles. 

Sock_heel_setup_

Working back and forth only on the 32 heel stitches 

Row 1: (Slip 1, knit 1) repeat until end of needle.

Row 2: Sl 1 purl to end. 

Row 3: Sl 1, (sl 1, k1) repeat until 1 stitch is left, k1.

Row 4: Sl 1, purl to end.

Repeat these 4 rows until there are 31 rows in total, finish with Row 3.

Heel turn

Next row, start heel turn: purl 18, p2tog, p1, turn. 

(These are short rows and you only knit SOME of the stitches in each row)

Sl 1, k5, ssk, k1, turn.

Sl 1, p6, p2tog, p1, turn.

Sl 1, k7, ssk, k1, turn.

Sl 1, p8, p2tog, p1, turn. Continue in this way until all stitches are used.

The last ssk, will NOT have a matching k1, and the last p2tog also does not have a matching p1,but it requires a yarnover to start the next row. Please see picture.

How to Yarnover at the beginning of a row: bring yarn to the front, insert needle into first stitch as to knit, bring yarn over the needle to the back to knit this first stitch.

(Note: The yarnover is to reduce the chance of a hole forming at this spot. If the instructions are too confusing, just omit this yarnover for simplicity, it will not change the pattern. Optional instructions are in italics.)

Sock_heel_yo1Sock_heel_yo2

There should be 1 yarnover and 18 stitches on your needle.

Sock_heel_turn

Rearrange the 2 needles holding 16 stitches each for the top of the foot to 1 needle holding 32 stitches.

Pick up 16 stitches along the edge of the heel flap. I picked up 15 stitches along the edge, then the 16th stitch was from the stitch in the corner turn. This minimises a hole in that area. Place Marker. 

Sock_pick_upSock_pick_up_2Sock_corner

Knit in pattern across the 32 stitches for the top of the foot. Place Marker.

Pick up 1 stitch in the corner between the leg of the sock and the heel flap, then pick up 15 stitches along the side of the heel flap. 16 stitches picked up. 

Slip the yarnover from the previous row then knit across 9 heel stitches.

At this point, you should have 27 stitches on Needle 1, MARKER 1, 32 stitches on Needle 2, MARKER 2, 27 stitches plus 1 yo on Needle 3.

Decreasing heel stitches

Decrease round: K to 3 stitches before Marker 1, k2tog, k1, slip marker. Knit in pattern across top of foot. Slip Marker 2, k1, ssk, knit to stitch before the yarnover, slip yarnover as if to knit slip the next stitch, knit these 2 stitches through the back loop, then knit to base of heel.

This completes the first round of decreasing. 

All subsequent decrease rounds will not have the extra ssk for the yarnover.

Plain round: Knit all stitches to marker, slip marker, knit in pattern across top of foot, slip marker 2, knit all stitches.

Repeat these two rounds until each of the two heel needles have 16 stitches remaining on each.

Sock_heel_ndl1Sock_heel_ndl2

Additional Note: In case you did not notice from the photos, I do not actually use stitch markers, but use the space between two needles as the indicator for decreasing the heel stitches.

 

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Kawaii baby kimono

Hiya! Hope you’re happy and healthy where you are. It’s the cold and flu season around here and it’s been like walking acoss a minefield when I’m out and about, dodging the sneezing and coughing. Thankfully I haven’t caught anything serious. Phew!

So do you remember the baby kimono I showed you in my previous blog post? Well I used the nicely wound mini skein of handdyed yarn to neaten up the edges around that baby kimono. As you can see from the photo below, the bind off edge around the neckline has left a rather ugly stair step. Yuck. We can’t leave it like that, can we?

20120506 attached i-cord on baby kimono

To neaten this up, I knitted an attached i-cord right around the edges. I’m not very good at remembering technical stuff so I used this attached i-cord tutorial from Purl Bee to refresh my memory. The colourful i-cord also added a much needed zing to the kimono. It is after all for a baby.

And here is the finished jacket. Ta-da! A super kawaii (cute) baby kimono for my girl.

Baby Kimono

Interesting fact – Did you know that kimonos are worn left over right? It doesn’t matter whether you’re male or female. They only dress corpses right over left! So take note when knitting a kimono for yourself. You don’t want to wear it the wrong way. Might be bad luck or something.

Free pattern: Garter stitch baby kimono (Ravelry download)
Yarn: Treliske Organic Merino 4ply from Ecoyarns and Kathy’s Fibres SW Sock
Needles: 2.5 mm and 3.0 mm
Mods: Cast on for newborn but knit length longer (1-3 months length) to make it less boxy. Attached i-cord edging.  
Ravelry project page

baby kimono and stay-on booties

I had some leftover yarn from the jacket so I knitted booties to match. But there’s a bit of a story and a tutorial with those booties. So until next time, stay warm and keep on knitting!

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SOCK KNITTING Part 1

Happy Mothers Day!

I do hope you enjoyed your Mothers’ Day as much as I did. 

I would like to introduce the Newcastle Farmers’ Market. This fresh food market is fantastic for fresh produce direct from the producers and includes small artisan made items. The Umbrella Artisans carries some of our Ecoyarns, including some of Vivian’s handspun yarns and fibres and batts for spinning or felting.

The Ecoyarns Top Down Sock was previewed several weeks ago, if you missed the instructions, here they are again

For those who are really keen to cast on those Top-down socks, Using 2.25mm needles, cast on 64 stitches and join in the round. K2 p2 for 20 rows.

Use either double pointed needles (dpns) or 2 circular needles

The yarn I am using is ANNA, this yarn knits up at a light fingering to fingering guage for the Americans, or 3-4 ply for us Aussies.

It is perfect for baby items like booties and socks of course.

Materials:
2.25mm needles dpns
Sock yarn 100g for an average sized foot. Larger feet will need more yarn.

Cast on 65 stitches onto one needle, divide the stitches onto 3 needles ( usually 20, 20, 25 stitches). Carefully join into a round. The last stitch is passed over to the first needle and it and the first stitch cast on are then knitted together for a jogless join. See picture.
Mark beginning of round. 
I used the Twisted German Cast On as I find it strong yet stretchy. This LINK takes you to a YouTube Video to show how it is done.

Rounds 1-20 : K2 P2 repeat till end of round.
Option to K2 P2 for 10cm.

Round 21: Knit all stitches.
Round 22: (Knit 3, Purl 1) repeat till end of round.
Rounds 23-24 : Knit al stitches.

Repeat Rounds 21-24 until leg measures 12 cm (or until length preferred).

Sock_1Sock_2Sock_3Sock_4Sock_5
Sock_6_k2tog
Sock_7
Sock_8
Next week we will continue the pattern from the heel of the sock.

Photo competition

Fancy being a winner?
Send in your photos of items made with Ecoyarns or Fabrics, including laces and go in our draw for prizes.
Send photos to ecoyarnstore@ecoyarns.com.au by the 31st of May to enter the draw.
Winners will be drawn on the 3rd of June.

First prize $100 gift voucher
Second prize $50 gift voucher
Third prize $30 gift voucher

Please include your name, email address and postal address.

Legal bits: You own the right to the photograph, we only ask that we have your permission use the photo on the Ecoyarns website, emails or blog for 2012 only.

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Tutorial: Winding a (mini) skein of yarn using basic household items

Hello! How is everyone today? It’s starting to feel like winter is almost upon us here in Sydney. I’ve actually started wearing my handknitted sweaters again. Yay!

Today’s blog post is to complement Vivian’s tutorial a few weeks ago about skeining and balling hand-dyed yarn. I have an alternative method to show you where I use basic household items to wind skeins of yarn into balls. I find this way of winding especially good for winding mini sampler skeins of yarn. My pretty sampler skein is from Kathy’s Fibres and it was part of the Ewe Beaut Fibre Sampler. Pretty, isn’t it?

Did you know that Ecoyarns is a regular contributer to Ewe Beaut and other sampler boxes? Subscribe now to our blog (RSS) and newsletter (email) so you never miss out!

Tools you’ll need:
2 heavy containers – I use a coffee tumbler and coffee jar filled with water
Toilet paper roll 

20120506 Winding tools

1. Unwind your skein and untie the ends. A larger skein of yarn probably has shorter bits of yarn tied around the skein to hold it together. Remove these. 

2. Place the untwisted skein over the containers as shown below. For larger skeins, use the back of two chairs as Vivian explained in her tutorial.

20120506 Wind yarn around jars

3. Cut 2 slits on opposings sides (on one end) of your toilet paper roll. Slip one end of the yarn into the toilet paper roll. See pictures below.

4. Start winding the yarn around the toilet paper roll. Do this for a few rounds. Keep a loose, even tension.

20120506 Wind yarn around toilet paper roll

5. Wind the yarn at an angle and slowly move the toilet paper roll around. It should start looking like this. 

20120506 Keep winding around toilet paper roll

6. Ta-da! You have now wound a skein into a ball. I find that knitting directly from this toilet paper roll is easier when you don’t have much yarn. But if you started with a full size skein, then you can just squeeze the toilet paper roll and slide it out. It then becomes a neat centre-pull ball.

20120506 Wound mini skein

I’ve shown you a sneek peak of my current project. I used this pretty handpainted yarn to finish the baby kimono I knitted for my girl. But that’s for another week. I can’t wait to show you the finished product. To quote the hubby, “That’s the cutest thing you’ve made so far!” :))

Happy knitting!

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